Tag: Federal Government

10 Ways to Build a Canada that Wins: 2019 Election Edition

For the past seven years the Canadian Chamber of Commerce has published the 10 Ways to Build a Canada that Wins (formerly the Top 10 Barriers to Canadian Competitiveness).

This report, which is read widely by decision-makers in government and elsewhere, articulates a series of clear priorities and objectives that, if addressed, will give Canada a competitive edge, improve productivity and grow the economy.

It is key that the 10 Ways to Build a Canada that Wins reflects the views of our members—businesses big and small throughout Canada—especially in an election year. That is why, this year, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce is partnering with Hill+Knowlton Strategies on this feedback exercise. 

Please participate in this 5-to-10-minute confidential feedback survey.




By giving us your input, you will be:

  • shaping the Canadian Chamber of Commerce’s 2018 message to the federal government and other stakeholders, and
  • telling chambers of commerce at the national, provincial, territorial and local levels about the priorities that are important to you, both as a Canadian and a business person.

Please provide your input!




Tariff Rate Quota (TRQ) For Certain Steel Goods

On October 25, the federal government will enact provisional safeguard measures on the importation of a number of steel products, including heavy plates, concrete reinforcing bars, energy tubular products, hot-rolled sheets, pre-painted steel, stainless steel wires and wire rods. These will be administered in the form of a tariff-rate quota. For more information, please see the below notice from the federal government.  “This message pertains to imports of certain steel goods as set out in the Order Imposing a Surtax on the Importation of Certain Steel Goods. The purpose of this message is to inform Canadian businesses that the Government of Canada is imposing provisional safeguards in the form of tariff rate quotas (TRQs) on seven classes of steel goods. The provisional safeguards will take effect on October 25, 2018. We encourage you to disseminate this information to your members to ensure that Canadian businesses are aware that they need to obtain an import permit if  imported goods are to avoid the over-access surtax. Imports that exceed the quota will be subject to a 25 per cent surtax.  The TRQs will be administered by Global Affairs Canada by way of shipment-specific imports permits on a first come, first served basis. In order for goods to be considered within the quota, they must be covered by a valid import permit at time of accounting. Please refer to the Notice to Importers, Serial No. 911, and the Frequently Asked Questions for detailed information on which products and countries are covered by the TRQs, how the TRQs will be administered and how to apply for a shipment-specific permit.”

The Government of Canada is updating federal labour standards.

Please find attached a survey from the Federal Government relating to feedback on the ongoing review of federal labour standards.

The main issues this survey addresses include vacation hours, break periods for meals, as well as newer concepts such as a “Right to Disconnect” (ie, be unavailable for work-related email or phone contact), and the various definitions of “Job Quality” related to employment.

We encourage you to take 5 minutes to complete this survey so that your views are shared with the federal government.  More information can be found here.


Business Tax Changes Are Coming – Make Your Voice Heard

Changes to Corporate Taxation: Your MPs need to hear from you! 

Last month, the Federal Government released a discussion paper on tax planning using private corporations. The proposals in this paper focus on three main areas: tax deferrals, income splitting and capital gains taxes.

The complexity and rigidity of the proposed changes will not only add to the cumulative regulatory burden facing small businesses, it will also cost small business owners thousands of dollars and discourage business investment. The government says these changes only target “the highest income earners” who have “unfair tax advantages”, but in fact this will affect hardworking, honest business owners of all income levels.


Your MPs need to hear how these proposed changes will affect businesses throughout Oakville and across Canada. Contact MP John Oliver and or MP Pam Damoff to make your voice is heard! Be sure to contact them before September 5 to make sure they’ve heard you before parliament resumes.  


“Neutralizing” Tax Deferrals 

The government wants to neutralize the “tax deferral advantage” associated with making passive investments through a private corporation. Business owners can leave income in a corporation (where it is taxed at a lower rate than personal income) so that they can reinvest that income and help their business grow. Keeping income in a corporation also allows businesses to cope with fluctuating businesses cycles. The government wants to eliminate any advantages from this practice by eliminating certain refunds and restricting eligibility for certain tax rates. These proposals stand to undermine legitimate investment practices and discourage business growth.  


Reforming Income Splitting


The Federal Government is also proposing changes to income splitting taxation. Any individual who receives split income that is determined to be unreasonable will be taxed at a higher rate. An amount would be considered unreasonable to the extent that it exceeds the average sectoral salary. This proposal neglects the unofficial functions that many individuals receiving split income perform in small businesses. For example, a spouse of a small business owner may perform several business-related tasks outside of their job title which explains their higher-than-average salary. 


Corporate Tax Reform Affects All Business Owners


Unfortunately, changes to income splitting and tax deferrals are not the only changes under consideration. The Federal Government’s sweeping proposals include additional reforms such as a restriction on the lifetime capital gains exception.

As a whole, these proposed changes would impact all Canadians who own and operate private companies, including family businesses and incorporated professionals. Ultimately, these proposals would increase the complexity of the tax rules applicable to private corporations and reverse many of the tax policies which have fostered business growth for decades. The government says they are targeting “the highest income earners” who have “unfair tax advantages”, but that is simply not true: these changes stand to affect hardworking, honest business owners of all income levels.

It is imperative your MPs hear from you directly on how these changes will affect your business before their annual Liberal caucus retreat on September 5. We encourage you to contact your MP directly with your concerns; you can reach MP John Oliver here and MP Pam Damoff here.

For more information on the proposed tax changes, contact your tax planner or contact the chamber so we can put you in touch with one of Oakville’s many professionals. 

Questions or concerns?

If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to reach out to Faye Lyons, Vice President of Government Relations & Advocacy at 905-845-6613 x 211 or faye@oakvillechamber.com .



Taxation of Employer Sponsored Health Benefits

The federal government is considering taxing employer-paid health and dental benefits. Along with adding hundreds or thousands of dollars to Canadians’ tax bills, this proposal could cause many employers to stop offering coverage to employees. When Quebec introduced a similar tax, 20% of employers dropped health and dental benefits for employees. Studies suggest the removal of this tax benefit across the board could result in a decrease of 50% of small firms that will be able to offer health benefits. Read the letter that the Oakville Chamber of Commerce sent out this morning to Mr. John Oliver, MP Oakville and Ms. Pam Damoff, MP Oakville North Burlington cc’ing Mr. Bill Morneau, Minister of Finance and local media.